Limited numbered hybrid SACD pressing on Mobile Fidelity. Leave it to Bob Dylan to follow three of the most pioneering electric-based albums in history by again deviating from the norm and straying from expectation. Hinting at a return to his folk roots and firmly pointing toward the field that became country rock, John Wesley Harding breathes with relief and freshness, the sound of an artist re-engaging with the past, forging a future, and stepping into new realms after recovering from an accident and unimaginable pressure. This restored SACD version presents the 1967 album with the finite details and impressionistic tones. Immediately notable for the slimmed-down instrumentation, brisk flow, and simple approach, the record continues to endure via a rustic, era-defying naturalism tied to the organic sounds and warm production swathing Dylan's acoustic guitar, mellow voice, breezy harmonica, and minor accompaniments. Recorded around the same time as the sessions that yielded The Basement Tapes, John Wesley Harding came together after just three studio sessions and approximately 12 hours of time. While many specifics are shrouded in mystery, a majority of songs are tied to Biblical figures, ominous matters, and morality themes. Climbing to #2 on the Billboard charts and quickly tallying one million in sales, the pared-down work resonated with a public ensnared by it's myriad charms. Then, of course, there's the utter brilliance of every one of the songs here, each seemingly occupying a timeless space that suggests they could've been made in 1967, 1937, or 2007. With "All Along the Watchtower, " Dylan landed upon a tune that would soon become one of the most-covered and revered tracks in history. And yet it isn't even a standout on an album on which every note just belongs.
Limited numbered hybrid SACD pressing on Mobile Fidelity. Leave it to Bob Dylan to follow three of the most pioneering electric-based albums in history by again deviating from the norm and straying from expectation. Hinting at a return to his folk roots and firmly pointing toward the field that became country rock, John Wesley Harding breathes with relief and freshness, the sound of an artist re-engaging with the past, forging a future, and stepping into new realms after recovering from an accident and unimaginable pressure. This restored SACD version presents the 1967 album with the finite details and impressionistic tones. Immediately notable for the slimmed-down instrumentation, brisk flow, and simple approach, the record continues to endure via a rustic, era-defying naturalism tied to the organic sounds and warm production swathing Dylan's acoustic guitar, mellow voice, breezy harmonica, and minor accompaniments. Recorded around the same time as the sessions that yielded The Basement Tapes, John Wesley Harding came together after just three studio sessions and approximately 12 hours of time. While many specifics are shrouded in mystery, a majority of songs are tied to Biblical figures, ominous matters, and morality themes. Climbing to #2 on the Billboard charts and quickly tallying one million in sales, the pared-down work resonated with a public ensnared by it's myriad charms. Then, of course, there's the utter brilliance of every one of the songs here, each seemingly occupying a timeless space that suggests they could've been made in 1967, 1937, or 2007. With "All Along the Watchtower, " Dylan landed upon a tune that would soon become one of the most-covered and revered tracks in history. And yet it isn't even a standout on an album on which every note just belongs.
821797218368
John Wesley Harding [Limited Edition Hybrid SACD - DSD]
Artist: Bob Dylan
Format: CD
New: IN PRINT AND ORDER-ABLE - NOT IN STORE, call or email $41.99
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

More Info:

Limited numbered hybrid SACD pressing on Mobile Fidelity. Leave it to Bob Dylan to follow three of the most pioneering electric-based albums in history by again deviating from the norm and straying from expectation. Hinting at a return to his folk roots and firmly pointing toward the field that became country rock, John Wesley Harding breathes with relief and freshness, the sound of an artist re-engaging with the past, forging a future, and stepping into new realms after recovering from an accident and unimaginable pressure. This restored SACD version presents the 1967 album with the finite details and impressionistic tones. Immediately notable for the slimmed-down instrumentation, brisk flow, and simple approach, the record continues to endure via a rustic, era-defying naturalism tied to the organic sounds and warm production swathing Dylan's acoustic guitar, mellow voice, breezy harmonica, and minor accompaniments. Recorded around the same time as the sessions that yielded The Basement Tapes, John Wesley Harding came together after just three studio sessions and approximately 12 hours of time. While many specifics are shrouded in mystery, a majority of songs are tied to Biblical figures, ominous matters, and morality themes. Climbing to #2 on the Billboard charts and quickly tallying one million in sales, the pared-down work resonated with a public ensnared by it's myriad charms. Then, of course, there's the utter brilliance of every one of the songs here, each seemingly occupying a timeless space that suggests they could've been made in 1967, 1937, or 2007. With "All Along the Watchtower, " Dylan landed upon a tune that would soon become one of the most-covered and revered tracks in history. And yet it isn't even a standout on an album on which every note just belongs.