Record Exchange Boise

This is the debut album from hot Country star Gretchen Wilson, her first single is "Redneck Woman."
This is the debut album from hot Country star Gretchen Wilson, her first single is "Redneck Woman."
827969090329
Gretchen Wilson - Here for the Party

Details

Format: CD
Label: SNY
Catalog: 90903
Rel. Date: 05/11/2004
UPC: 827969090329

Here for the Party
Artist: Gretchen Wilson
Format: CD
New: IN STOCK AT OUR STORE Used: Used Items are fully guaranteed to be free from defects, and good as new.
Wish

Formats and Editions

More Info:

This is the debut album from hot Country star Gretchen Wilson, her first single is "Redneck Woman."

Reviews:

''Here for the Party'' is the 2004 debut album by American country music singer Gretchen Wilson. It reached the top of the US country charts in May 2004 and #2 on the Billboard 200 album charts.

Featured on the album is Wilson's breakthrough debut single, "Redneck Woman", a Number One hit on the ''Billboard'' Hot Country Singles & Tracks (now Hot Country Songs) charts. The tracks "Here for the Party", "When I Think About Cheatin'", and "Homewrecker" were also released as singles; these three singles all reached top 5 on the country charts as well.

The album received four Grammy nominations: Best New Artist, Best Country Album, Best Country Song ("Redneck Woman") and Best Female Country Vocal Performance ("Redneck Woman"). Gretchen Wilson won Best Female Country Vocal Performance. - Wikipedia

Nothing like nailing down an indelible persona with your first hit. Gretchen Wilson is already introduced as the "Redneck Woman" at country radio showcases, and Pocahontas, Illinois, may be country music's most familiar hometown since-well, sorry, but since Butcher Holler, Kentucky. Yet for all Wilson's sass and willingness to send a wanton "Homewrecker" to Fist City-not to mention the casual ease with which she shoulders her iconicity-the Loretta Lynn comparison's as inaccurate as it is glib. Wilson's timbre is far more like Natalie Maines (though less pinched). Besides, she's got way crappier taste in music: on "Redneck Woman," she claims to know the words to every song by Charlie Daniels, Tanya Tucker, and Hank Williams, Jr. Gretchen, honey, you lapped the first two easy, and the third squandered whatever respect his genetic heritage and early country-rock triumphs earned him well before Carter left office.

Yet Wilson namechecks Skynyrd and "Kid" (that'd be Mr. Rock) on the same song, so don't expect any dumbass quibbles about country is's and ain'ts. Wilson's strength is her willingness to throw herself into a song and leave distinctions between rock and hard honky-tonk to record-store shelvers. Whether squeezing into tight jeans on the title track to tease the boys ("I'm not a ten but the men say I clean up nice") or wringing lust and fear from "When I Think About Cheatin'," Wilson's not just proud of where she came from, she's determined to remain there, at least in spirit. And being as hell hath no fury and all, she'd better. If she ever tries to get all uppity with a Dianne Warren megaballad, redneck gals from every area code will string her up by her bootstraps.

"Nothing like nailing down an indelible persona with your first hit. Gretchen Wilson is already introduced as the ""Redneck Woman"" at country radio showcases, and Pocahontas, Illinois, may be country music's most familiar hometown since-well, sorry, but since Butcher Holler, Kentucky. Yet for all Wilson's sass and willingness to send a wanton ""Homewrecker"" to Fist City-not to mention the casual ease with which she shoulders her iconicity-the Loretta Lynn comparison's as inaccurate as it is glib. Wilson's timbre is far more like Natalie Maines (though less pinched). Besides, she's got way crappier taste in music: on ""Redneck Woman,"" she claims to know the words to every song by Charlie Daniels, Tanya Tucker, and Hank Williams, Jr. Gretchen, honey, you lapped the first two easy, and the third squandered whatever respect his genetic heritage and early country-rock triumphs earned him well before Carter left office.

Yet Wilson namechecks Skynyrd and ""Kid"" (that'd be Mr. Rock) on the same song, so don't expect any dumbass quibbles about country is's and ain'ts. Wilson's strength is her willingness to throw herself into a song and leave distinctions between rock and hard honky-tonk to record-store shelvers. Whether squeezing into tight jeans on the title track to tease the boys (""I'm not a ten but the men say I clean up nice"") or wringing lust and fear from ""When I Think About Cheatin',"" Wilson's not just proud of where she came from, she's determined to remain there, at least in spirit. And being as hell hath no fury and all, she'd better. If she ever tries to get all uppity with a Dianne Warren megaballad, redneck gals from every area code will string her up by her bootstraps.

"
        
back to top