Limited orange colored vinyl LP pressing. In the early-to-mid 1970s, Belgian recording engineer and synthesist Daniel Lacksman née Lanckmans recorded and released a series of pop music records, using early analog synthesizers as a central sonic element. Under an admittedly confusing array of names, Lacksman (who later founded the group Telex) created music that was equal parts innovation and ear-candy accessibility. Those often happy-go-lucky records gained some popularity throughout Europe, but their lasting influence can be heard in the music of Portishead, Massive Attack, The Moog Cookbook, and Air, not to mention among the lengthy list of 21st century artists who have sampled these recordings. And a casual survey online quickly reveals that these records are among the most collectible of their kind, with original copies commanding hundreds of dollars. None of Lacksman's records, however, are quite as collectible as the one he recorded in 1974 under the name Electronic System, Tchip Tchip (Vol. 3). While much of side one Tchip Tchip presents the composer's signature blend of synthesizer kitsch and boundary-breaking creativity, ranging from the oom-pah sound of the title track to the wacky 'Spider,' almost all of side two is devoted to the 14-minute 'Sky Lab,' which sounds like it came right off an Air record recorded 25 years later, with maybe a little Dark Side-era Pink Floyd thrown in. A true marvel, this track is why original copies of Tchip Tchip are downright unaffordable'it's not to be missed. Our Real Gone Music reissue has been mastered for CD and LP from the original tapes by Lacksman himself, and feature liner notes by Bill Kopp that include exclusive quotes from Lacksman and photos from his private archive.
Limited orange colored vinyl LP pressing. In the early-to-mid 1970s, Belgian recording engineer and synthesist Daniel Lacksman née Lanckmans recorded and released a series of pop music records, using early analog synthesizers as a central sonic element. Under an admittedly confusing array of names, Lacksman (who later founded the group Telex) created music that was equal parts innovation and ear-candy accessibility. Those often happy-go-lucky records gained some popularity throughout Europe, but their lasting influence can be heard in the music of Portishead, Massive Attack, The Moog Cookbook, and Air, not to mention among the lengthy list of 21st century artists who have sampled these recordings. And a casual survey online quickly reveals that these records are among the most collectible of their kind, with original copies commanding hundreds of dollars. None of Lacksman's records, however, are quite as collectible as the one he recorded in 1974 under the name Electronic System, Tchip Tchip (Vol. 3). While much of side one Tchip Tchip presents the composer's signature blend of synthesizer kitsch and boundary-breaking creativity, ranging from the oom-pah sound of the title track to the wacky 'Spider,' almost all of side two is devoted to the 14-minute 'Sky Lab,' which sounds like it came right off an Air record recorded 25 years later, with maybe a little Dark Side-era Pink Floyd thrown in. A true marvel, this track is why original copies of Tchip Tchip are downright unaffordable'it's not to be missed. Our Real Gone Music reissue has been mastered for CD and LP from the original tapes by Lacksman himself, and feature liner notes by Bill Kopp that include exclusive quotes from Lacksman and photos from his private archive.
848064010920
Tchip Tchip (Vol. 3) (Colv) (Ltd) (Org)
Artist: Electronic system
Format: Vinyl
New: IN PRINT AND ORDER-ABLE - NOT IN STORE, call or email 23.99
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Limited orange colored vinyl LP pressing. In the early-to-mid 1970s, Belgian recording engineer and synthesist Daniel Lacksman née Lanckmans recorded and released a series of pop music records, using early analog synthesizers as a central sonic element. Under an admittedly confusing array of names, Lacksman (who later founded the group Telex) created music that was equal parts innovation and ear-candy accessibility. Those often happy-go-lucky records gained some popularity throughout Europe, but their lasting influence can be heard in the music of Portishead, Massive Attack, The Moog Cookbook, and Air, not to mention among the lengthy list of 21st century artists who have sampled these recordings. And a casual survey online quickly reveals that these records are among the most collectible of their kind, with original copies commanding hundreds of dollars. None of Lacksman's records, however, are quite as collectible as the one he recorded in 1974 under the name Electronic System, Tchip Tchip (Vol. 3). While much of side one Tchip Tchip presents the composer's signature blend of synthesizer kitsch and boundary-breaking creativity, ranging from the oom-pah sound of the title track to the wacky 'Spider,' almost all of side two is devoted to the 14-minute 'Sky Lab,' which sounds like it came right off an Air record recorded 25 years later, with maybe a little Dark Side-era Pink Floyd thrown in. A true marvel, this track is why original copies of Tchip Tchip are downright unaffordable'it's not to be missed. Our Real Gone Music reissue has been mastered for CD and LP from the original tapes by Lacksman himself, and feature liner notes by Bill Kopp that include exclusive quotes from Lacksman and photos from his private archive.